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Archaeologia Cantiana -  Vol. 86  1971  page 149
Eynsford Castle and its Excavation. By S. E. Rigold, M.A., F.S.A., F.R.Hist.S.
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Window-glass (Fig. WG): about 20 fragments from D, east of Hall, representing a minute part of a high quality window or windows. Bed and blue strips, without visible painting, and grisaille (G 3) far superior to that from Temple Manor, Strood, set up and removed at about the same dates. Designs include drapery of fluent brushmanship and foliage, with some lines 'cotised', quite free of naturalism and consistent with a reconstruction of the Hall around A.D. 1240. The characteristic trefoils with three circlets at the tip appear, e.g. in a window at Stanton Harcourt, Oxon., assigned by C. Woodforde to the first half of the thirteenth century.48

V. Bone artifacts (Fig. 11)
   O 1. Off cut of antler (toggle?), possibly showing friction by a cord (Z, west slope under Great Kitchen).
   O 2. Turned bodkin or 'stylus' with remains of iron pin in tip; spherical head and ornamental grooves (D, north side of Hall). These implements are fairly frequent on medieval sites, usually in earlier contexts than this one; then- purpose must be domestic (sewing?) rather than writing on tablets.48a
   O 3. Bone disc ornamented with trios of concentric circles, the inner circles faint; central hole and eccentric depression, suggesting attachment—a button or pommel rather than a gaming-piece (same context as O 2).

VI. Lead
   Offcuts of thin and thick (2 mm.) sheet lead from D.

Stuart Rigold was a highly intelligent person. In fact he served during WWII with the Ultra Team of code-breakers at Bletchley Park. Sections on the plan are listed using the Greek Alphabet, which may not display correctly in some browsers. In the text each Greek letter is followed by its Roman equivalent in [ ]

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Re-examination of the bulk of the stratified pottery by Dr Alan Vince, of the Lincolnshire Archaeological Trust, in the light of recent pottery studies, has yielded significant results suggesting that the differentiation of the Hall complex from the curtain wall, 'Old Tower' and platform, proposed by Rigold on ceramic grounds, cannot be substantiated. It can also be suggested that all the pottery from the early structural phases of the castle (Rigold's Phases W, X and Y) may be of eleventh-century date, though no earlier. This review of their dating suggests that the first phase (W) may have begun sometime in the early eleventh century, supporting the stratigraphic evidence (presented above) of a settlement predating the early Norman castle. See Eynsford Castle: A Reinterpretation of its early History in the Light of recent Excavations. By Valerie Horsman  Arch. Cant cv (1988) 39-57

VII. Pottery
   This is classified under the main phases, as defined in the excavation section, and under three general categories: i, fully shell-gritted coarse wares, quite distinct from any others, dominant in all phases down to C yet totally extinct in D; ii, unglazed sand-tempered wares, with many fabrics and intermediate varieties and a continuous gradation in shell-content from fairly high (but distinct from category i) to nil: these wares form a very small, but increasing, proportion from W onwards, are still very much in a minority in A, approaching equality in B, and absolutely predominant in D; iii, glazed wares, a very small proportion, even in D. In category i each phase has its own characteristic rim-forms, while the fabric modifies slightly but gradually. After Y there is an overlap in rim-forms, small but sufficient to prove the completeness of the series. In W and X the material from Eynsford is insufficient to make a comprehensive series; that from Lullingstone enlarges the range but is not precisely enough stratified to point the development.
   48  English Stained and Painted Glass (1954), PI. 3, r.
   48a  of. Proc. Suffolk Inst. Arch., xxviii (1959) 145.

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