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Archaeologia Cantiana -  Vol. 1  1858  page 44
ON ANGLO-SAXON REMAINS RECENTLY DISCOVERED AT FAVERSHAM, AT WYE, AND AT WESTWELL, IN KENT. BY C. ROACH SMITH, ESQ
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We learn from the historian Bede, that shortly after the Romans finally departed from Britain, three different tribes of the Teutonic race, at intervals, settled in the island. These were the Jutes, who occupied Kent and the Isle of Wight; the Saxons, forming the divisions known as the East Saxons, the Middle Saxons, the South Saxons, and the West Saxons; and the Angles, who established themselves in extensive portions of the east, the west, and the north: the East Angles, the Mercians, and Northumbrians. That the historian's statement is correct in the main, dialects, physiognomy, the names of places, and other remarkable peculiarities seem to certify, as well as the circumstances under which the various branches of the Teutonic race found themselves placed at the period of the decadence and fall of the Roman power in Britain. It will be extremely interesting if the remains in the graves of the different districts should be found confirming our belief in the information given us by Bede. Up to the present time our researches certainly seem to support the historian's statement. The beautiful circular fibulae from Faversham, as well as the pendent ornaments, are common in the Saxon cemeteries in Kent, while they are of rare occurrence in those of other parts of England. I need only refer you to the discoveries made at the sites explored by Douglas and Bryan Faussett, at the cemeteries at Osengal,1 Stowting,2 Sittingbourne,3 Minster in Thanet, at Maidstone, and in other localities; and then direct comparison with the contents of Saxon cemeteries in Cambridgeshire, in Suffolk, in Norfolk, in Northampton, and in the west of England, to ensure conviction of the marked difference
which exists in these ornaments. The circular fibulae of Kent are seldom met with in the districts mentioned 
  1 Collectanea Antiqua, vol. iii.
   2 A Brief Account of the Parish of Stowting, etc.; by the Rev. Frederick Wrench. London. 1845.
   Col. Ant., vol. i.

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