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Archaeologia Cantiana Vol. 55 - 1942 page 76
MISCELLANEOUS NOTES:   "THE STAR INN," CANTERBURY. Continued

considerable, though not irreparable, damage in the heavy air raids both of 1940 and June 1942. A passage shown in the drawing leads under the inn into a courtyard at the back, and is still called Star's Place. The portion to the west of this opening is now a small public house—the Rose and Crown; the eastern portion is divided into two shops. In a modern wall at the back of the building is inserted the stone plaque inscribed
                                          1567
                                       D.G.J.G.
It has not been possible to identify these initials; the records of Holy Cross parish near the boundary of which the inn stood, are fragmentary. The will of William Bygge (December 12th, 1470) of St. Peter's parish, leaves to his wife, among much other property throughout the city, his 

"tenement called the Sterre and one called the Forge in the parish of Holy Cross, Westgate."
   Bygge, a baker by trade, was twice Mayor of Canterbury (1460 and 1466). He had some interest in the Fleur-de-Lis Inn, and may have built some part of it. His bequest of £10 towards the completion of St. George's Gate is noticed by Somner. His son John Bygge (Mayor, 1472, 1473, and 1474), owned and enlarged Cogan House. The stone plate may thus record the reconstruction of an older inn. Is it possible that the initials stand for "Deo Gratia, Jesu gratia" ?
                                       DOROTHY GARDINER
[The drawings are the work of the late A.G. P. Minty, who at the time lived at Ospringe but later moved to Petersfield. He married a Miss Arden, a descendant of Shakespeare's mother, and my mother's second cousin.—EDITOR.]

 

A ROMAN SITE AT LITTLE CHART, WEST  OF ASHFORD

MR. Robert Geering, of Ashford (Local District Secretary) supplies the following preliminary report, which has been drawn up in collaboration with Mr. A.G.B. Chittenden, on the discovery in June, 1942, of the site of a Roman Villa in a field known as Stambers at Little Chart.
   The approximate 6" map reference is Sheet LIV. S.W.Lat. 51°, 10' 40", Long. 0°, 46' 30".
   The site, together with about 60 acres of adjoining land, is leased to Messrs. R. Brett & Sons, Ltd., of Canterbury, as a stone quarry, and is owned by Mr. Walter Gaskin, of Chart Court. They have kindly permitted exploration and 

shown a desire to preserve the site of the villa, for which the Society records its grateful thanks.
   The discovery was made by a workman operating a steam navvy which opened up foundations and brought to the surface a considerable section of tessellated pavement. This man wisely suspended operations and reported the matter to the manager, Mr. Kinnear. The firm, through him, brought the discovery to the Society's notice, and we have to thank this gentleman for his lively interest throughout the period of excavation, and for the subsequent filling in.

Page  76   (This page was prepared for the website by Aaron Meyer)      

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