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    Archaeologia Cantiana -  Vol. 32  1917  page 82
                               
                       RECULVER AND HOATH WILLS. By Arthur Hussey  Continued

   Thomas Howlott in 1493, to his sister Rose.
   Richard Fanting in 1495, to his wife.
   Richard Werchenden in 1497, to his wife.
   Thomas Butt in 1500, to his wife.
   Nicholas Hawlott in 1505, to his wife.

House Building.
  
Thomas Haulet in 1537 left directions that a new hall was to be built at his tenement called Stormayns, and the other buildings repaired, and mentions where the timber was to be felled.

Repair of Bad Roads.
   Thomas Gylward in 1509 left 33s. 4d. to mend the way between Newcroft gate and his house at Helbarowe (the present day Hullborough).
   Isabella Hikke, widow, in 1510, to the repair of the foul way at Sandpit 13s. 4d.

   Thomas Paramore, senior, in 1545, to repair the highway between his tenement called Stermans and Horsysylit gate, 6s. 8d.
   Alexander Paramore in 1546, to repair the highway between Brente (i.e., Burnt) Mill and Helborow Cross, 20s.

Boats.
   William Richfield in 1491 bequeathed a boat (cimbam) with its sails, anchor, and two cables.
   Nicholas Hawlott in 1505 left his small vessel (naviculum) called the Cache, with all thereto, to his sons Robert and John.
   John Haulet in 1526, that his brother Thomas was to buy Johnís part of the Kache, paying for it 46s. 8d.
  The " Cache" probably is a ketch, a vessel with two masts.

Page 82  (This page prepared for the Website by Ted Connell)                  

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