KENT ARCHAEOLOGICAL SOCIETY  -- RESEARCH   Studying and sharing Kent's past      Homepage

Archaeologia Cantiana Vol. 14 -1882  pages 60
                                                     
THE EARLY HISTORY OF TENTERDEN. By Robert Furley, F.S.A.   Continued

the Reformation. Zeal sometimes carried them beyond discretion, for amongst the prominent leaders of Wat Tyler's rebellion were men from Tenterden and Smallhythe. Richard Owen of Tenterden was one of those who were excepted from the general pardon; and as might be expected, this district supplied its full quota of the followers of Jack Cade.
   In Archbishop Laud's return to Charles I of the state of his diocese, under Tenterden he says:"There is some refractory people here, but, by the aid of the archdeacon, I hope to keep them in order."
   Though I have not nearly exhausted my subject, I fear I have exhausted your patience. I have given you, from the 

best materials I could collect, a hasty sketch of Tenterden in bygone times, and I have only to express my hope that modern Tenterden may be prosperous, and its inhabitants happy. A few years ago it gave a title to Charles Abbot, a native of Canterbury and Chief Justice of England, created Lord Tenterden in the year 1827; and as an incentive to the rising generation, I will conclude in the words of a late distinguished member of our Society:"Lord Tenterden's career will prove to future generations that in England the most lowly born may attain the highest honours by the exercise of industry, application, patience, and intelligence."

Page  60   (This page was prepared for the website by Aaron Meyer)      

Previous page       Back to Page Listings                           

For details about the advantages of membership of the Kent Archaeological Society   click here

Contents Page    Back to Arch. Cant. List   Back to Publications On-line    Back to Research Page   Back to Homepage

Kent Archaeological Society is a registered charity number 223382
Kent Archaeological Society March 2005

This website is constructed by enthusiastic amateurs.  Any errors noticed by other researchers will be to gratefully received so
 that we can amend our pages to give as accurate a record as possible. Please send details too research@kentarchaeology.org.uk