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     Archaeologia Cantiana -  Vol. 6  1866  page 171

  ACCOUNT OF THE SOCIETY'S RESEARCHES IN THE SAXON CEMETERY AT SARR (SARRE) Part 2

 

No. LXXXIII.—A double interment. A bronze stud, two Roman coins, and a knife.
No. LXXXIV.—Disturbed; the bones much deranged. Only a small double glass bead.
No. LXXXV.—An oblique grave; disturbed. A bone of sheep or deer was found with the skeleton, as well as a

roken knife, and a bronze fibula of the ring shape. The latter measures about an inch and a half in diameter, and is ornamented with little grooves, and with bosses at intervals as if to imitate joints. One much like it is figured in the ‘Inventorium 

Sepulchrale,’ and Mr. C. Roach Smith describes another found at Ozingell. Mr. Akerman gives a plate of a similar ring, with keys suspended from it, in his ‘Pagan Saxondom’ (p. 57). From the archaic character of this  

fibula, and the facts that the grave varied considerably in direction from its neighbours and contained an animal’s bone, I am inclined to rank this among the oldest of the graves at Sarr.
No. LXXXVI.—A sword at the left, three feet long, including hilt; a small piece of amber near the knees; a pair of bronze tweezers, nearly three inches long and well preserved, much resembling Chatham Lines and 

described in the ‘Nenia Britannica,’ fig. 6, plate 13; a bronze buckle near the centre, some studs, and a broken knife.
No. LXXXVII.—Disturbed. A spear-head, a bronze buckle, and stud.

Page 171  (This page prepared for the Website by Christine Pantrey)          

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