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     Archaeologia Cantiana -  Vol. 5  1863  page 308

  ACCOUNT OF THE SOCIETY'S RESEARCHES IN THE SAXON CEMETERY AT SARR (SARRE)
By JOHN BRENT, JUN., F.S.A.  continued

seen entrenchments and caves,1 as in the ancient wood of "Chesmunds," where he supposes the Saxon inhabitants to have taken refuge from the Danes.
   At the junction of the ferry and the ‘Dunstrete’ the south-western promontory of the island, was the ‘Dun,’ or Down of Sarr, an important and central position, commanding the country for miles around: and on this spot is the Cemetery into which we have been making researches, and which I proceed to describe.
   Although, as will be seen, it has proved to be one of our richest and most interesting Anglo-Saxon burying-places, it appears to have escaped the notice of all Kentish antiquaries. Bryan Faussett, Douglas, Stukely, and Mortimer, make no mention of it; Mr. Wright omits it from his Map; and the revelations of Ozingell give no hint of the neighbouring treasures at Sarr. Certain Saxon relics, however, were reported to have been found here some

years since, such as a bronze stoup, a drinking-glass, and a  fine fibula. But the attention of our Society was first called to this spot as a Saxon cemetery by the discovery made, during works on the property of Mr. Holman, at Sarr windmill, in July, 1860, of a remarkably fine fibula, some gold coins, a bronze bowl, and other articles of great interest. These relics, which are described by Mr. C. Roach Smith, in the fourth volume of ‘Archaeologia Cantiana,’ were purchased by the British Museum, and our Society at once opened negotiations for further researches on the land immediately adjoining, the property of the Marquess Conyngham. The noble owner kindly gave the required permission, but some delay was inevitable, on account of the injury, which would be caused to the seed crop then on the land. This year, however, in the month of August, Mr. Swinford, Lord Conyngham’s tenant, in a most courteous manner gave to the writer of
1 History of Thanet, p. 25.

Page 308  (This page prepared for the Website by Christine Pantrey)             

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